A New Year Means New Hydroponic Experiments!!!

2014 Fertilizer Experiment

Atlantis Hydroponics’ Potential Fertilizers for Testing in 2014

Although many of us are still reveling in the wonderful 2013 holiday season, I have already turned my attention to the upcoming year. I have been given the opportunity to test some great new hydroponic fertilizers designed to ensure that our 2014 crops are the biggest and best ever…and I would like to share this opportunity with all of you!

There is one dilemma: There are too many products from which to choose.  So I propose you, the readers, pick which products are tested in my experiment. The experiment will be conducted under a 600 watt HID light in a 4′ x 4′ side by side drip to waste hydroponic system. The potential fertilizers for testing are: Mills nutrients bio-mineral fertilizer line (a great Dutch organic/synthetic fertilizer), ROCK nutrients line of chemical fertilizers, Bio Tabs time release biological organic fertilizer line, Xtreme Nutrients line of fertilizers guaranteeing to produce a great grow, and last but not least the well known 3 part (grow, micro, & bloom) line of fertilizers from Humboldt Nutrients.

Vote for what you would like to see tested. Vote early. Vote often. Encourage others to vote. Vote for what you want and I will test, document and share ALL of the results.

Have a Happy New Year and thank you for your readership and participation.

An Element Too Good To Pass Up: The Benefits of Silicon to Your Garden

Si on Periodic table

Si on Periodic table

Would you use a product that would increase your harvest weight by as much as eighty percent? What if it also provided increased tolerance to environmental stressors such as drought and high temperatures, provided resistance to insect attacks, and additionally had been proven to protect your crop from powdery mildew (Sphaerotheca fulginea), root rot (Fusarium oxysporum), damping off (Pythium), and grey mold (botrytis cinerea)? Now, what if I told you this product is real, that it is available, and that the above list of accolades does not even scratch the surface of what it has been proven to do?

This miracle product happens to be the second most abundant element on the surface of the earth: silicon. Although not regarded as one of the 16 essential nutrients that plants must have to grow, silicon may prove to be the best addition to your fertilizer regimen you can make. Plants have certainly been shown to grow in hydroponic solution devoid of silicon, but when the same plants are grown with silicon, tissue analysis has shown that silicon accounts for as much as 10% of the dry weight of the plant. Everyone wants bigger harvests, and using silicon could be the key. A study conducted by the University of Florida found that silicon responsive plants had “dry weight increases (which)…ranged from 6-80% depending on the species” (Chen et al, 2000).

So how does this “non-essential” element have such a huge impact on so many facets of your plants’ existence? Silicon performs its multitude of functions in two ways: by the polymerization of silicic acid leading to the formation of solid amorphous, hydrated silica, and by being instrumental in the formation of organic defense compounds (Epstein, 2009). To simplify, silicon is actively transported into the plant similarly to macro nutrients like potassium. From there it moves up the xylem and is distributed out to the growing shoots. There, the silicon forms larger polymer chains (polymerization) which allows plants to deposit silicon in the form of solid amorphous (non crystalline), hydrated silica which is then incorporated into the plant’s cell walls, thereby armoring the plant’s cells against rasping and sucking insects. If you are growing leafy greens think how much better the texture of the leaves will be when every one of the millions of plant cells has thicker cell walls from the added silicon.

Additionally, silicon is deposited in the trichomes of plants, according to Epstein; it “is the silica in trichomes that lends leaves and awns (stiff bristle or hair-like appendages in plants) the roughness and the toughness that impede the penetration of herbivores and pathogens through the cell walls. It acts as a physical barrier.”

The other mode by which silicon benefits your plants is in its ability to promote the synthesis of organic defense compounds. When a plant is under attack by insects or pathogens it sends out chemical messages which trigger the plant’s natural defenses. A study conducted on cucumbers yielded conclusive proof the plants were protected from fungal pathogens by the presence of silicon in the hydroponic solution (Cherif et al, 1992).

Another benefit of the use of silicon is that it balances the nutrient absorption of your plants. Silicon can balance nutrient elements in plant tissue through the suppression of Al, Mn, and Na, and by mediating the uptake of other elements like P, Mg, K, Fe, Cu, and Zn (Chen et al, 2000). When used with peat or bark based soil/soilless mixes, silicon prevents the over-acidification of the mix, which can lead to pH induced nutrient lockout, as well as inhibiting the absorption of toxic elements like aluminum. When anthuriums were grown in soil with available aluminum the tissue tested had 150 PPM of aluminum, while the plants grown in the same soil but fed silicon tested at only 41 PPM.

One bit of advice when introducing silicon additives into your feeding program: silicon products must be the first thing added to a fresh reservoir of water, even before base nutrients. By their inherent chemical properties silicon additives are alkali, and because most fertilizers are acidic they must be diluted before they are added to a hydroponic reservoir or any water fertilizer mixture. This will allow for the concentrated alkali silicon solution to diffuse, thus preventing localized chemical reactions from causing the formation of undesirable nutrient precipitates.

Silicon can be a cure, a booster, a medicine, and a messenger. It can counteract damage to your plants from extreme temperatures or prevent the absorption of toxins that would otherwise destroy your plants. It can send insects to more inviting hosts, and it can increase the weight of your harvest. Silicon truly is a multipurpose beneficial element that should be in every gardener’s toolbox. Think of it as the best and cheapest plant insurance you can buy!

Dr. Dave’s Quick Tip: How to Improve Sugar Content, Brix, and the Flavor of Your Harvest

Strawberry with sugar

Follow these tips for a harvest sweeter than this strawberry!
photo coutesy of freedigitalphotos.net

The devil is in the details, or so the saying goes, and harvesting your plant is no exception. You take so much time to meticulously fertilize your plants; pain-staking attention is paid to pH and PPM, but many gardeners get so excited around harvest time that they do not take the correct measures to ensure that they get the best harvest possible from all of their hard work. Here are two tips about harvesting your plants that will ensure that your fruits are as sweet and delicious as they can be:

1. Always harvest in the late afternoon (or slightly before the lights go out for you indoor growers). This is because plants make less energy during the Kreb cycle (a chemical process that takes place at night); as such they utilize some of their stored starch and sugar reserves, making the morning (or lights on) the lowest Brix/Sugar content time of the day.

2. Do not keep your planting media saturated for a few days before harvest. Scientific studies have shown that extended periods of precipitation (moisture in the growing medium) provide so much moisture to the plants that the Sugar/Brix level can become diluted. I am NOT telling you to allow your plants to become bone dry, but try to water sparingly during the days preceding harvest.

Try these tips for the sweetest fruit, and check back soon for more tips to make your garden great!

Control Your Plants by Controlling Your DIF: A Guide to Daytime and Nighttime Temperature Differential

Day Night Temp Differential

We have all had that friend that needs to control everything; from where you eat, to what movie you see…everything seems to be their choice. While that friend might need to loosen up (or maybe they need to seek professional medical attention), controlling all aspects of your garden will repay you in spades. Indoor gardening is all about control; control over photoperiod, control over temperature, control over plant nutrition, etc. By controlling everything from the photoperiod to the specific nutrition a plant receives, we effectively remove all barriers that may hinder our plants; optimally that control will allow them to reach their maximum genetic potential. An often overlooked environmental factor that can greatly impact your plants is the DIF, or the day night differential. DIF is the difference in the highest day time (lights on) temperature and the lowest night time (lights off) temperature. Control over your DIF will give you control over your plant’s height and internodal spacing without the use of dangerous or untested chemicals or plant growth regulators.

Research about DIF is not new to science; back in 1944, Went made detailed observations about the effect of the night time temperature (Tn) on the stem growth rates of tomato plants. He originally proposed the term ‘thermoperiodicity’ to describe the apparently greater rate of plant growth and development in diurnally fluctuating temperatures compared to plants grown at constant temperatures. Although his research was disproven in 1990 by Ellis et al, Went’s research was the beginning of our attempts to understand the impact of temperature on plant growth.

In 1983 while studying the effects of temperature on the Easter Lily (Lilium longiflorum), it was observed that there was an interaction between day and night temperatures that affected the length of the floral stem. This relationship, coined DIF (Erwin et al, 1989), was used to describe the elongation of the stem in response to diurnal thermoperiod and photoperiod interaction. They noted that the magnitude and nature of the internodal elongation varied between different species and also between different cultivars of the same species.

Plant height or stem length is simply the sum of the lengths of each of the internodes. Therefore, to control plant height one must manage internode number, internode length, or both. The number of nodes and the length of each internode (the distance from one node to the next) are strongly influenced by temperature. As DIF increases, so does the internode length of most plants. It is important to understand that the effect of DIF on internode length is due to increased cell elongation, and not an increased number of individual plant cells. Plants respond rapidly to changes in DIF, with altered growth rates that are often observable in as little as 24 hours.

Although managing your garden’s DIF will afford you some control over your plant’s internodal elongation, there are factors that influence or compound the DIF response. The Average daily temperature influences internode length and thus the response to DIF in many plants. The quality of the light being received by your plants has been shown to influence the DIF response, presumably through effects related to phytochrome photoequalibria (Moe and Heins, 1990). While incandescent lighting used for photoperiod control can eliminate a plant’s response to DIF, fluorescent lighting has been shown to increase the response (Moe et al, 1991).

With the proven effects of DIF at controlling plant height, how do you exploit this information to grow a better garden? First, day time and night time temperatures must be controlled independently and excess humidity must be removed from the air by using dehumidifiers. Watch for significant increases in your DIF; a large swing between your day time and night time temperature will bring a marked increase in humidity. If the high night time humidity level is left unchecked it can lead to mold and disease on your fruits and flowers.

During the vegetative light cycle (18 on, 6 off), your target DIF should be 5 degrees Fahrenheit. Try to maintain a daytime or “lights on” temperature of 85 degrees Fahrenheit, and 80 degrees Fahrenheit when the lights are off. For the blooming or fruiting phase of your plant’s life cycle (12 on, 12 off), your target DIF should still be 5 degrees Fahrenheit; but the daytime “lights on” maximum temperature should be limited to 80 degrees Fahrenheit, and your “lights off” temperature to 75 degrees Fahrenheit. By maintaining the DIF at 5 degrees your plants will exhibit the tightest internodal growth, lowering the overall size of your plants while building a tight network of branches. Remember that the temperature and DIF recommendations above are starting points as different species and cultivars (or clones) will react differently to a controlled DIF. Controlling your DIF could make all the difference to your garden!

Dr. Dave’s Quick Tip: Add an Air Stone to Blow Up Your Cuttings

Air Stone in Clone Tray

Air Stone in Clone Tray

When taking cuttings using organic super plugs, rockwool, or oasis foam, this simple and inexpensive tip will greatly enhance the root system of your cuttings and lead to a higher success rate. If you are using a standard nursery propagation flat and 72 compartment insert or one of our complete propagation kits to take your cuttings, place an air stone attached to an air pump in the bottom of the tray. Keep about 3/4 of an inch of water (and your favorite clone solution) in the tray, covering the air stone partially or completely, depending on the type of air stone that you choose. By bubbling air into the propagation water you will maintain an elevated level of oxygen in the water. Your cutting’s roots will develop more vigorously, and as an added benefit they will be able to stay in the tray a bit longer if need be.